The laws of tech attraction: Why great tech will bring in even better talent

Business leaders should be focused on implementing software that increases collaboration and agility, eliminating any unnecessary, tedious tools. Not all tasks can be automated, but by taking the time to listen to employees and hear their grievances, business leaders can then decipher which technologies will serve them best, writes Shiva Pillay, Vice President APJ, Sales and Field Operations, Veeam.

If there is one thing we’ve come to realise in 2020, it’s that the show must go on. Despite Covid-19’s curveballs, majority of businesses across the country have responded with great dexterity.  As we head into 2021, we can anticipate that our work from home arrangement will remain. Findings from research firm McCrindle reveal that 78 per cent of Australians want to spend at least a certain amount of time working from home in future.

With employees adjusting to our new normal, industries may begin to see an increase in job turnover. Retaining top talent now will be critical to a business’ success in future. For this reason, it is vital that business leaders consider how all aspects of a workplace may impact one’s experience at work.

No matter what obstacle is thrown a business’ way, company data should always be available and protected, allowing the business to get on with day to day operations.

Compassion over Compliance
The way organisations handled the shift to remote working will remain with employees for life. Employees who were met with compassion will reflect on how understanding their employers were. Those who were met with distrust and micromanagement will have likely developed resentment towards upper management.

2021’s ‘Best Places to Work’ lists will be headed by organisations who have perfected their work from home policies. McCrindle research also revealed that Australians are 80 per cent more likely to stay longer with an existing employer if the employer provided them with the flexibility of working remotely or from home. Interestingly, just over half (51 per cent) of those interviewed were prepared to forego a percentage of their pay in exchange for greater flexibility in their working arrangements.

The measures organisations took to accommodate to their employees during the pandemic will become a key criterion for job seekers. Large organisations will be able to attract and retain talent based on how they handled the crisis. The best talent in the industry will be on the lookout for the best policies available to them. Uncompassionate and inconsiderate organisations can expect to be left behind.

Business leaders should be reminded that it takes the best to retain the best and that without people power, their businesses are nothing.

Driving Productivity though Automation
There is nothing more frustrating than being forced to work with unreliable software. Just because employees are contributing remotely, doesn’t mean an organisation’s productivity should have to suffer. Agility and collaboration should remain a key priority.

Employees are working to deadlines and don’t have time to wait for obsolete software to load. Updating critical technologies and ensuring they meet the needs of employees enhances business performance and reduces stress levels across the organisation.

Mundane, repetitive tasks are proven time wasters. Automation can be the key to liberating employees from tiresome admin tasks. McKinsey research reveals that around 60 per cent of workers could automate almost a third of their jobs and responsibilities. Working remotely is all about working smart, not long, gruelling hours. Introducing automated services across the entire organisation unlocks valuable time, promoting a more engaging workplace environment, in turn, boosting company morale.

Business leaders should be focused on implementing software that increases collaboration and agility, eliminating any unnecessary, tedious tools. Not all tasks can be automated, but by taking the time to listen to employees and hear their grievances, business leaders can then decipher which technologies will serve them best.

Employees who were met with compassion will reflect on how understanding their employers were. Those who were met with distrust and micromanagement will have likely developed resentment towards upper management.

Safeguarding Critical Data
All too often it is wrongly presumed that since Microsoft Office 365 already resides in the cloud, there is no need to store another copy of the data. This misconception becomes extremely problematic when employees accidentally delete or lose files and their work cannot be retrieved. Although Microsoft provides SLAs to keep Office 365 up and running, the onus of the data resides with user organisations, not Microsoft.

It’s considerations such as these that have the power to influence an employee’s attitude to work. Business leaders should be looking to technologies, such as cloud, to improve their employee’s experiences. Backup and restoration software eliminates the risk of losing access to employee data, whether it be held on Exchange Online, SharePoint Online or OneDrive. No matter what obstacle is thrown a business’ way, company data should always be available and protected, allowing the business to get on with day to day operations.

Flexible working policies, automation and backup technology are only a few measures business leaders can take to make sure their employees feel supported working from home. Business leaders should be reminded that it takes the best to retain the best and that without people power, their businesses are nothing.

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