How can HR project the best talent brand through socials

Leveraging their employee’s network and getting them to amplify their talent brand online is vital

Defining an organisation’s talent brand on social networks is one of the most common challenges HR faces when it comes to talent management and the online world, according to LinkedIn.

“Prospective talent want to work for a company that has a reputation of being a great employer, so a strong talent brand can help companies diminish some of the compensation pressures they may face,” said Jason Laufer, director talent solutions, Australia and New Zealand for LinkedIn.

“To do this, companies need to leverage the best brand ambassadors they have available to them – their employees – to amplify their brand message through social networks.”

Companies also need to ensure that their talent brand aligns with the company brand.

“Making sure that there is shareable content true to the company values and existing talent brand, is essential,” said Laufer.

“Leveraging their employee’s network and getting them to amplify their talent brand online is vital.”

What do candidates want?
A recent LinkedIn talent trends study found that candidates use the interview process to size-up their potential employer, with 76 per cent of candidates saying the overall interview experience is a major factor when deciding whether to join the organisation or continue their job search journey.

To embrace a candidate-first philosophy, Laufer said recruiters need to think about the candidate journey and the importance of meeting the candidate’s needs.

The study also found that over two-thirds (70 per cent) of candidates are particularly interested in meeting their future manager during the interview process.

“So having management involved early on can be beneficial in attracting and retaining the best talent,” said Laufer.

“Also, giving candidate feedback is really crucial to keep them engaged throughout the recruiting process. Offering interview feedback to talent goes a long way to show that organisations care about their professional success whether or not they end up working with them.”

The study found that 94 per cent of Australian professionals want to receive interview feedback, however, only 53 per cent said they have received interview feedback.

Implications for HR
Leveraging data is vital for HR leaders to ensure they have an effective recruitment strategy, and Laufer said keeping the candidate journey the priority during the talent acquisition process will help talent acquisition professionals in attracting the best candidates.

The study provided four tips for HR and organisations in the process:

  1. Include the most impactful information in your initial message to candidates
  2. Partner with hiring managers and leadership to create a great interview experience
  3. Keep in touch consistently with candidates after the interview experience
  4. Focus on what factors matter most to talent when considering a job offer

“We all want to work for a company that has a reputation of being a great employer, so a strong talent brand can help companies diminish some of the compensation pressures they may be facing,” said Laufer.

“Organisations need to adopt a candidate-first philosophy. A strong first impression followed by subtle levels of attentiveness will make a difference.

“The organisations that win top talent today are the ones that know how to surprise and delight their candidates throughout their job search journey.”

Image source: iStock