Developing vital skills for the future of work

In a recent HR industry wide survey polling more than 1,800 HR professionals across Australia and New Zealand, upskilling and reskilling the workforce were cited as the most difficult issues for HR professionals. Preparing employees as the economy and the business world recovers from the pandemic is a key priority, writes Laura Petruccelli, Director of People, APAC, Contino

Human resources leaders are facing significant challenges delivering employee engagement and upskilling in the new world of remote working. According to research by The University of Sydney, 75 per cent of workers believe their employers will support future work from home plans, while the majority of staffers want to work remotely at least two days per week in the post-COVID world.

There are a range of reasons people want to keep working from home. For some, achieving a work-life balance is easier; for example, dropping kids at school and picking them up at the end of the day, or looking after elderly relatives who might need additional care. For others, working from home removes the significant number of hours they spend commuting to and from a CBD office. This makes them more productive and leaves them feeling refreshed at the end of the day.

In a recent HR industry wide survey polling more than 1,800 HR professionals across Australia and New Zealand, upskilling and reskilling the workforce were cited as the most difficult issues for HR professionals. Preparing employees as the economy and the business world recovers from the pandemic is a key priority.

With an increasing number of companies adopting the hybrid workplace model, CHROs and their teams must find ways to ensure that their workforce continues to be equipped for what’s to come.

By creating an environment that supports L&D, upskilling and reskilling, HR is able to align both leadership teams and employees on the same page to ensure success for the individual and the business.

Reactive and predictive models may not always work
Gartner found that 60 per cent of HR leaders report pressure from the CEO to ensure employees have the skills they need for the future. It also found that 69 per cent of HR executives report more pressure from employees to provide learning and development (L&D) opportunities that will prepare them for future roles.

When it comes L&D, some HR teams make sure of a reactive model while others adopt a predictive approach based on some level of data and analytics. While there are pros and cons of these models, the fast-changing needs of a post-pandemic world means business leaders must adapt and pivot accordingly.

The way forward is to move away from reactive and predictive models and take a dynamic approach to skills development.

Utilising a dynamic approach
The most effective HR functions tap into this approach because it allows them to respond to the changing needs of the broader business landscape in real time – this empowers employees to make informed decisions on skills that addresses the needs of both company and industry.

Realising this, Contino has developed a dual delivery and upskilling model to support the operations of customers by providing their tech teams with the necessary skills that they need, whilst delivering on an enterprise solution.

This is a dynamic method that fosters a close working partnership by building collaborative cross-functional teams that supports the end goals of their business. This tried and tested way of working has been applied to customers such as Origin Energy and Jetstar and enabled the growth of their cloud operations team, empowering them towards a more self-sustaining future.

With an increasing number of companies adopting the hybrid workplace model, CHROs and their teams must find ways to ensure that their workforce continues to be equipped for what’s to come.

By creating an environment that supports L&D, upskilling and reskilling, HR is able to align both leadership teams and employees on the same page to ensure success for the individual and the business.

In some way, shape, or form, every organisation is preparing for the future of work. In order for companies to maintain their edge in an increasingly competitive world, businesses must ensure that people are equipped to meet future skills demands and evolve to make effective use of new technologies and approaches to learning.

Image Source: Pexels